Opposition in Kenya wants President Kenyatta impeached over teachers’ pay

CUT DOWN ON STATE HOUSE BUDGET AND PAY TEACHERS: Senate Minority Whip Moses Wetangula says

CUT DOWN ON STATE HOUSE BUDGET AND PAY TEACHERS: Senate Minority Whip Moses Wetangula says

The Coalition for Restoration of Democracy (CORD) the main Kenyan opposition alliance members in the country’s National Assembly have called for the impeachment of President Uhuru Kenyatta following his stance against recent court ruling ordering the government meet the salary demands of striking teachers.

Senate Minority leader Moses Wetangula stated this week “refusal to obey court orders is a serious violation of the constitution, more so coming from the Head of State.”

Wetangula cited the funds allocated for the President’s overseas trips and the laptop project could be put to good use raising teachers’ pay.

Wetangula questioned why pupils should have laptops when the government cannot pay teachers an additional Kshs 13,000.

In order for a motion of impeachment to materialize, it needs it support from 1/3 of members of the lower chamber of parliament and another two thirds for the motion to pass the senate.

Political observers in Nairobi say the opposition move is a non-starter President Kenyatta’s ruling Jubilee Coalition enjoys a majority in both the house and the senate.

PAY DEMANDS UNSUSTAINABLE: President Uhuru Kenyatta

PAY DEMANDS UNSUSTAINABLE: President Uhuru Kenyatta

In response to striking teachers and their demand for pay increase President Kenyatta last week came out against the move saying the government cannot afford to raise teachers’ salaries unless Kenyans are willing to pay more in taxes.

“Over 50 per cent of what government collects now goes to paying salaries and with the new demands, we will be at over 60 per cent. What is going to be left for development?,” President Kenyatta told the press in Nairobi adding “we have to start looking at some of these demands against the economic reality. To pay more, we must be able to make more first.”

Kenyan teachers are demanding a 50-60 percent salary increment.